US drone strikes in the Philippines? How about no?

Source of this entry: http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/u-s-may-begin-airstrikes-against-isis-philippines-n790271

The Marawi crisis is far from over, with our soldiers engaging in fierce room-to-room combat aided by airstrikes using the new FA-50s bought from South Korea, with occasional assistance by foreign countries. Our traditional allies (United States, Australia, Japan) as well as non-traditional allies (China and Russia) are providing us military and non-military assistance, to combat the threat of extremism and for reconstruction and rehabilitation.

However, there is one thing that could potentially be worrisome, that is the US planning to use the Philippines a staging ground for drone strikes, which they have been doing to Yemen and Pakistan, ostensibly to eliminate the threat from extremist groups such as ISIS and affiliated groups.

The Pentagon is proposing such plan, subject to approval. Yet we have the consider the potential backlash and backfiring of said plan, as US intervention in Iraq, Libya, and Syria among others have only worsened the situation. The traditional left (Bagong Alyansang Makabayan) has already spoken out against this proposal, and so I do.

This proposal could violate constitutional provisions prohibiting the maintenance of foreign military bases on Philippine soil and the inevitability of ethical implications, such as civilian casualties, not to mention the potential interference in the domestic affairs of another sovereign state, and further fanning the flames of extremism, prompting terror groups to stage more attacks.

Combating this kind of terrorism entails efforts of all nations in the world, but with the present-day realities there has to be a more systematic approach, where cooperation is necessary but still allows individual nations take different approaches in solving this common problem. Intelligence sharing, combat training, and weapons assistance will be enough. But at the same time implementing long-term policies such as education and integration, as well as mutual respect which will help in making sure future generations will not be tempted in resorting to extremism, as well as policies aimed at eradicating prejudices and fosters understanding, hence the dream of being able to live side-by-side in peace and harmony becomes a reality.

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Trump’s foreign policy, its consistencies, and how it might affect the world

Have you noticed how inconsistent the Trump administration is when it comes to foreign policy? In much of his speeches and policy, Donald Trump has been promoting cooperation with Russia in issues like terrorism (and the war in Syria) and how “he would like to get along with President Vladimir Putin” but at the same time has advocated a hawkish stance on countries where Russia has built up strong relations like Cuba, Iran, China, and others.

Trump has advocated a hawkish stance on the South China Sea at a time when the claimant states like Vietnam and the Philippines has adopted policies setting aside their differences in exchange of economic cooperation.

Trump has threatened to reverse the progress made since the Iran deal was signed and appears to be heading to a position of war, again contradicting Trump’s promises of not heading into another war and instead focus on domestic issues.

In Israel, despite criticisms over its settlement program, Trump as well as Republicans are turning a blind eye.

When it comes to the wall, Trump has proudly stated that Mexico will “pay for the wall” (Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has said many times Mexico will not pay for a wall)  when in fact should a import tariff be imposed on Mexican imports American taxpayers will pay for the wall.

Across Europe, there is widespread concern on whatever course Trump might be taking as the continent reels on an economic slowdown, migration crisis, and wave of terror attacks. In the Eastern part of the continent, the Baltic states, Poland, and Ukraine are concerned that Trump’s plans to improve ties with Russia will jeopardize their security interests, especially in Ukraine which has been embroiled in political turmoil and civil war since 2014 and renewed violence in the Donbass. On the other hand, far-right parties are taking cues from Trump’s victory and fears of a domino effect which will put an end to the European Union.

The recent immigration ban in seven countries in the Middle East (Iraq, Iran, Libya, Sudan, Yemen, Somalia, Syria) has provoked backlash. Interestingly and coincidentally, Middle Eastern countries with Trump businesses were not included (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, etc.).

When it comes to North Korea, which has been quiet for some time and with its southern neighbor embroiled in political crisis, and has stubbornly refused to give up its nuclear ambitions, it is yet to be seen what Trump will do.

With these contradictions and inconsistencies in mind, it appears we’re heading for the worst and possibly head to war. But let us hope we can do something to reverse whatever damage it will bring to the world.